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Referrals 0118 970 8023
General 0800 138 8680
General
Referrals 0118 970 8023 General 0800 138 8680

Are you worried about your exam results?...

Are you one of the thousands of young people waiting for exam results this week? How do you feel – anxious, excited, worried what your parents might say if you don’t get your grades?

Results day - whether it’s for your degree, your A levels or GCSEs - is always a nerve-wracking time. Even if you came out of the exam happy that you did enough revision and confident that you’ve done well, self-doubt can creep in. It’s important to remember that it’s entirely normal to have some nerves about your exam results. But everyone is affected differently, and some young people may start to feel particularly stressed or anxious. Some of the symptoms you might be feeling include:

  • Going off your food
  • Feeling like your stomach’s in knots
  • Fetting heart palpitations
  • Trembling or shaking

On this last day of waiting Dr Justin Haslam, Medical Director at the Priory Hospital Altrincham, offers seven tips to managing your nerves building up to the big day:

  1. Talk to your friends. They’re probably feeling just as nervous as you about getting their results.
  2. Tell your parents how you feel – most likely they have taken exams too and remember all too well what it was like waiting for results.
  3. Take your mind off results day by going to do something you enjoy. Spend time with friends, mooch around the shops, go to the cinema and see a film that makes you laugh.
  4. Do something active. Exercise releases endorphins, which make you feel happier. It doesn’t have to be hard-core. Take the dog for a walk, or play Wii games.
  5. Steer clear of mood-altering substances like alcohol or drugs. Any high will be temporary and you may well feel worse afterwards.
  6. Try not to catastrophise and imagine your life will be ruined if you didn’t do as well as you hoped. Yes, exam results are important, but staying mentally healthy is a priority. Exams can always be retaken.
  7. Above all, be kind to yourself. Don’t beat yourself up about what you didn’t do or should have done. All the worry in the world can’t change the past, nor the results you’re going to get.

If you are struggling to manage your feelings, don’t keep it bottled in. If you don’t want to speak to your parents here are some places you can go to for help including:Childline, Mind elefriends or your GP, who can refer you on to a specialist if necessary.

For more details on Priory Education and Children's Services, please call 0118 970 8068 or click here to make an enquiry.

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